Flapper’s dictionary: 1922


JimL sez, “Originally published in the July 1922 edition of FLAPPER magazine, this dictionary went into some detail, listing the group’s slang and providing definitions. In the process, it also provided an insight: through the slang we can begin to discern attitudes and priorities and the mindset of the adherents. And the adherents, after all, were our grandmothers and great-grandmothers. Who knew?”

Absent Treatment–Dancing with a bashful partner.
Airedale–A homely man.
Alarm Clock–Chaperon.
Anchor–Box of flowers.
Apple Knocker–A hick; a hay-shaker.
Apple Sauce–Flattery; bunk.
Barlow–A girl, a flapper, a chicken.
Bank’s Closed–No petting allowed; no kisses.
Barneymugging–Lovemaking.
Bee’s Knees–See “Cat’s Pajamas”
Bell Polisher–A young man addicted to lingering in vestibules at 1 a.m.
Bean Picker–One who patches up trouble and picks up spilled beans.
Berry Patch–A man’s particular interest in a girl.
Berries–Great.
Biscuit–A pettable flapper.
Big Timer–(n. masc.)–A charmer able to convince his sweetie that a jollier thing would be to get a snack in an armchair lunchroom; a romantic.

A Flappers’ Dictionary (Thanks, JimL, via Submitterator!)

English school principal announces zero tolerance for mismatched socks

The City of Ely Community College in Cambridgeshire, England has decided to restore discipline to its student body by nonsensically conflating genuinely disruptive behavior (talking in class) with mere individualism (wearing mismatched socks or brightly colored hair-bobbles). School principal Catherine Jenkinson-Dix is hell bent on producing a generation of young Britons who can’t tell the difference between cooperating with your peers and blind conformity — just what the future needs (assuming that the future won’t require any original thought).

Nonetheless, some shocked parents are attacking the new rules and accusing Ms. Jenkinson-Dix of turning the school into a “prison.”

“I’m absolutely appalled. They are wrecking pupils’ education and turning it into a prison,” Amanda King, 34, who pulled her 12-year-old son Ben and daughter Shannon, 14, out of classes, told the Cambridge News.

“Staff are nit-picking for everything -for behaviour, for what they wear. Apparently they are not allowed to wear any accessories or even coats in school now.”

Another mother, who asked not to be named, said, “Yes, children should be taught to respect their teachers but to punish them for wearing bright hair bobbles or having their mobile phones is petty. I’m not happy about the new rules at all.”

U.K. school cracks down on bad manners (Thanks, Bytefire, via Submitterator!)

(Image: Day 6 / 365 – Thinking in the corner, a Creative Commons Attribution (2.0) image from restlessglobetrotter’s photostream)

Xeni on Chris “@Nerdist” Hardwick’s NERDIST podcast

nerdist.jpg

Comedy genius and true-born nerd Chris Hardwick (@nerdist) invited me to join him as a guest on his very popular and very funny podcast. Here it is! Chris and his friendly LOL-sidekicks and I talked about what would happen if NPR and E! Television got married; the origin of Boing Boing; and the mainstreaming of geek culture.

And here’s his touring schedule. His live shows are incredible.

Download MP3, or listen in a flash player here.

Worldreader: ebooks for kids in the developing world

I’ve recently lent my support to Worldreader, an innovative nonprofit program that distributes ebook readers to children in the developing world and then exposes them to a large library of donated texts from writers from across the world, as well as newspapers and other materials. I was delighted to give them access to all my books (of course), and put them in touch with a large group of other kids’ and young adult writers who were happy to do the same (including my hero Daniel Pinkwater, who travelled in and wrote about Kenya and has a real love of Africa).

WR: What advice do you have for kids in developing countries who are just beginning to read and only have recently gotten access to books because of technology advancements?

Cory: I have a couple of pieces of advice about reading. One is that the most dangerous thing in the world is someone who has only read one book. The great thing about reading is that you can triangulate your ideas among lots of different authors, different times, or different place. When you read widely and broadly it shows you that everything is relative. It shows that there is a lot of ways of looking at things, and often times, problems can become solutions if looked at creatively.

The other piece of advice I would give them about reading electronically is to not allow their collections to be tied to one device or platform. Devices come and go, but data can live forever. The only way you can maintain access to them is if you insist on the ability and the right to move the books into any format or any platform you want to.

Writers Changing Lives: A Chat With Cory Doctorow

Chinese censors ban time travel TV shows

The Chinese General Bureau of Radio, Film and Television has prohibited new science fiction TV dramas, following a vogue for shows where modern Chinese people travel to ancient China and discover that it’s not a bad place to be (this having some counter-revolutionary subtext). They’ve also prohibited production of “the Four Great Classical Novels”, (“the four novels commonly counted by scholars to be the greatest and most influential of classical Chinese fiction”), on the grounds that the widespread adaptations of them take too many liberties with the original texts.

From the end of last year, the time-travel themed drama is becoming more and more popular. Most of these time-travel dramas are based on real historical stories but with many newly added, and usually exaggerated elements to make it funny and more attractive. Nothing is off limits in this television genre. While some find it hilarious, others think the exaggeration and even ridiculous elements added into the story is a real source of annoyance and is a disrespectful for history.

The authority’s decision was made on the Television Director Committee Meeting on April 1st. – but obviously it’s not a prank to fans of the drama genre. The authority has a good reason to go against the genre. “The time-travel drama is becoming a hot theme for TV and films. But its content and the exaggerated performance style are questionable. Many stories are totally made-up and are made to strain for an effect of novelty. The producers and writers are treating the serious history in a frivolous way, which should by no means be encouraged anymore.”

“No more time-travel drama”, authority says it disrespects history

广电总局叫停四大名著翻拍 批穿越剧不尊重历史

(via Making Light)

Fake-make: counterfeit handmade objects from big manufacturers

Make Magazine has started to publish my old “Make Free” columns online; today, they’ve posted “Untouched By Human Hands,” in which I speculate about whether (and when) big manufacturing companies will start to produce fake “hand-made” objects, and what makers might do in response.

Will the 21st-century equivalent of an offshore call-center worker who insists he is “Bob from Des Moines” be the Guangzhou assembly-line worker who carefully “hand-wraps” a cellphone sleeve and inserts a homespun anti-corporate manifesto (produced by Markov chains fed on angry blog posts from online maker forums) into the envelope?

I wouldn’t be surprised. Our species’ capacity to commodify everything — even the anti-commodification movement — has yet to meet its match. I’m sure we’ll adapt, though.

We could start a magazine for hobbyists who want to set up nostalgic mass-production assembly lines that use old-fashioned injection molders to stamp out stubbornly identical objects in reaction to the corporate machine’s insistence on individualized, 3D-printed, fake artisanship.

Untouched By Human Hands

(Image: Weaving by the Pool, a Creative Commons Attribution (2.0) image from 87739302@N00’s photostream)