Tag Archives: Science

Cheap, easy, no-mess cold-brew coffee 3

I’ve just finished teaching week four of the amazing Clarion Science Fiction Writers’ Workshop at UC San Diego; in addition to spending a week working closely with some very talented writers, I came up with a new and cheap way to make astounding cold-brew coffee. I bought a $10 “nut-milk” bag and a plastic pitcher. Every night before bed, I… Read More »

Cheap, easy, no-mess cold-brew coffee 4

I’ve just finished teaching week four of the amazing Clarion Science Fiction Writers’ Workshop at UC San Diego; in addition to spending a week working closely with some very talented writers, I came up with a new and cheap way to make astounding cold-brew coffee. I bought a $10 “nut-milk” bag and a plastic pitcher. Every night before bed, I… Read More »

Fukushima upgraded to Level 7 nuclear event—what’s that mean?

The nuclear reactor crisis at Fukushima Daiichi has been upgraded to a 7 on the International Nuclear Events Scale. That’s the same rating as Chernobyl. It’s interesting to me, though, how these two events can share the same rating, but still be quite different in several important ways. For instance, Chernobyl released a lot more… Read More »

Art and science are intertwined

“Almost all Nobel laureates in the sciences are actively engaged in arts as adults. They are twenty-five times as likely as average scientist to sing, dance, or act; seventeen times as likely to be an artist; twelve times more likely to write poetry and literature; eight times more likely to do woodworking or some other… Read More »

Central European folk-dancers illustrated sorting algorithms

Robbo sez, “Sapientia University has posted a series of videos using folk dances as a way to visualy demonstrate various sorting algorithms. It’s intensely geeky – and just downright cute too.” I love sorting algorithms — I actually use bubble-sorts in real life all the time when I’m trying to make subtle qualitative distinctions (picking… Read More »

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Wicked Plants on exhibit in San Francisco

(Totnesmartin photo/Wikimedia Commons) San Francisco’s gorgeous Conservatory of Flowers is hosting an exhibit titled “Wicked Plants,” all about poisonous plants and their place in history, from the lethal ricin-producing castor bean, to hemlock — aka “dead men’s oatmeal” (above), to white snakeroot, the weed that did in Abe Lincoln’s mom. The exhibit is named for… Read More »

Why fear and risk are hard problems

In honor of the International Year of Chemistry, a nice analysis of why people fear “chemicals” out of proportion to actual risk, and why no amount of haughty rationalization is likely to change that. (Via Deborah Blum)

A new physics, or a statistical error: Round-up of news from Fermilab

Last week, JArmstrong posted to the Submitterator about the big news out of Fermilab last week. Shorter version: An analysis of 10,000 proton-antiproton collisions made in the lab’s Tevatron particle accelerator turned up an anomaly that may, or may not, end up representing a very important discovery. Adding to the excitement, the Tevatron is scheduled… Read More »